Bookmark this for your calendars; 15 upcoming Project Acorn events and seminars

Mark your calendars and make your reservations early for these 15 exciting, upcoming spring events offered to the region by Ferdinand’s Project ACORN. Events are free unless otherwise noted.

Project ACORN (an acronym for Art, Community, Originality, Rhythm, and Nature) is a grassroots, all-volunteer, not-for-profit program launched in the summer of 2016. Inspired by the spirit and themes of the Ferdinand Folk Festival, a group of community-minded citizens wanted to provide opportunities to make art, music, environment, and wellness activities year-round, shared experiences—more of an everyday part of Ferdinand’s culture. And so began some fun brainstorming sessions and conversations, soon followed by the first group of classes, workshops, children’s theatre, hikes, films, concerts, and field trips for all ages in the area.

The four-season series—fifteen events per season—presented by local artisans and enthusiasts, continued through the past seven seasons as more people have learned about the program. Since June of 2016, 105 area events have involved about 80 leaders and 800 participants, and the numbers keep growing. The upcoming spring events featured in this flyer offer a new slate of interesting and educational opportunities for all ages in the region.

“The community and regional response has been tremendous,” states project chair Rock Emmert, “and the possibilities are endless. A rewarding side-effect is the camaraderie and friendships forming. Whether making new friends from surrounding towns on a hike or getting to know your local food growers, good things come from such collaboration. The idea behind ACORN is planting seeds, and it’s fun seeing where ideas might take root and grow.”

SPRING SCHEDULE 2018

THIS IS THE SHORT-FORM SCHEDULE.  FOR FULL DETAILS, PLEASE SCROLL BELOW.

1.  Wild Edible Hike by Brooke and Sam Sycamore
Saturday, April 14, 2018, 12:00 noon – 2:00 pm ET, Pioneer Mothers’ Memorial Forest, Paoli

2.  “We Gotta Get Out of This Place” Music of the Vietnam Era by Ed Walston
Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 6:00 – 8:00 pm ET, CTIM (Technology) Bldg Theatre, VUJC campus, Jasper

3.  In Search of Spring Wildflowers Celebrating John Muir’s Birthday by Marietta Smith
Saturday, April 21, 2018, 10:00 am – 12:30 pm ET, Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge, Oakland City

4.  John Muir in the New World: Earth Day Documentary by members of Project ACORN committee
Earth Day, Sunday, April 22, 2018, 2:00 – 3:30 pm ET, St. Benedict’s Brew Works Theatre, Ferdinand

5.  Loving Vincent by members of Project ACORN committee
Sunday, April 29, 2:00 – 3:40 pm ET, Ferdinand Library Community Room

6.  Energy Solutions to Indiana’s Environmental/Health Crisis discussion led by Ryan Zaricki, Alex Schmitt, and Neil Elkins
Thursday, May 3,  7:00 – 8:15 pm ET , Ferdinand Library Community Room

7.  Falls of the Ohio Hike by Dale Brown
Saturday, May 5, 2018, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm ET, Falls of the Ohio State Park, 201 W Riverside Dr., Clarksville

8.  Natural Healing Tips by Patty Ruhe
Monday, May 7, 2018, 6:30 – 7:30 pm ET, Forest Fresh, 301 Main St., Jasper

9.  Arm Knitting 101 by Melissa Pleiss
Wednesday, May 9, 2018, 6:30 – 8:30 pm ET, Serendipity Threads, 314 E 4th St., Huntingburg

10.  Dana and Susan Robinson in Concert by members of Project ACORN committee
Friday, June 1, 2018, 7:00 – 9:00 pm ET, St. Benedict’s Brew Works Theatre, Ferdinand

11. Nature Art for Kids! by Emily Meyer and members of Project ACORN committee
Monday, June 4, 2018, 6:30 – 8:00 pm ET, The Art Factory, 403 E 4th St., Huntingburg

12.  Family Fun Day! Benefit for the Ferdinand Folk Festival by the Ferdinand Folk Festival and Project ACORN committees, and St. Benedict’s Brew Works
Sunday, June 10, 1:00 – 4:00 pm ET, St. Benedict’s Brew Works and lawn

13.  Health Concerns about Proposed Coal-to-Diesel Refinery in Dale discussion led by Dr. Erin Marchand, Mary Hess, and Randy Vaal
Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 6:30 – 8:00 pm ET, Ferdinand Library Community Room

14. Making Italian Limoncello! by Doug Thayer
Tuesday, June 19, 2018, 6:30 – 8:30 pm ET, Monkey Hollow Winery & Distillery, 11534 E CR 1740 N, St. Meinrad

15. Composting: Healthy Soil, Healthy Living by Jerry Steckler
Saturday, June 23, 10:00 – 11:00 am ET, Steckler Grassfed, 21477 N CR 600 E, Dale


EVENT DESCRIPTIONS

Spring event #1 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Environment, Wellness

1.  Wild Edible Hike

Saturday, April 14, 2018, 12:00 noon – 2:00 pm ET
Field trip to Pioneer Mothers State Wayside / Memorial Forest, SR 37 one mile south of Paoli
All ages       Free       Limit: 10
To register and for gathering location, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call) or rockemmert@gmail.com.

Join recent Kentucky transplants Brooke and Sam Sycamore on an early spring foraging/wild plant identification walk in Pioneer Mothers Memorial Forest. Participants will take a slow and meandering walk through the park, stopping frequently to get to know the many common wild edible plants and spring ephemerals popping up all around. Hikers should wear suitable clothing and shoes. Participants might also want to bring along a sketchbook, camera, edible plant app on your phone, and/or an Indiana edibles identification book (if you have one). A pair of binoculars might also come in handy for watching birds and other wildlife.

Though this walk will cater primarily to the newbie forager, Brooke and Sam welcome folks of all experience levels to join in the fun. They admit that they are far from experts, but they’re excited to share what they know with their new community, and “learn from y’all too!” “The art of foraging is a lifelong pursuit, and we are thrilled to be able to train the next wave of wild food enthusiasts here in southern Indiana!” they said. “Rain or shine, it’s all good with us! Unless there are thunderstorms on the horizon, in which case we may reschedule. Invite your friends and family! The more the merrier.”

Spring event #2 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Music, History

2.  “We Gotta Get Out of This Place”
Music of the Vietnam Era

by Ed Walston

co-sponsored by Project ACORN and VUJC Campus Activities

Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 6:00 – 8:00 pm ET
The theater of the new CTIM (Technology) Building on VUJC campus, 850 College Ave, Jasper
Ages 13+       Free       Limit: 100
To register, please RSVP Ed at 812-326-2260 or ewalston1@g mail.com.
Light refreshments will be served.

In this popular, returning class (after a packed Ferdinand Library room of 40+ in August of 2017), join Vietnam veteran and singer-songwriter Ed Walston on a journey through some of the most poignant music that helped to define the 1960s and early 70s. Ed will speak from firsthand experience of how the music affected the young soldiers at war and the citizens back home. He will share some historical videos and perform some classic songs from the 60s. Anyone who plays an acoustic instrument is invited to bring it for a sing-along / play-along on four songs near the end of the program. Words and chords will be projected onto a screen.

Ed is a retired English teacher from Forest Park High School and currently teaches at Vincennes University Jasper. Also a long-time band leader of Ready-R-Not and TimePeace, he has a wealth of knowledge about music and history.

Spring event #3 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Environment, Wellness

3.  In Search of Spring Wildflowers: Celebrating John Muir’s Birthday

by Marietta Smith

Saturday, April 21, 2018, 10:00 am – 12:30 pm ET (Rain date: April 28)
Field trip to Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge, Oakland City

All ages       Free        Limit: 10
To join the field trip caravan, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call) or rockemmert@gmail.com. The caravan will depart from the Ferdinand Library at 8:45 am ET and return at about 2:00 pm ET.

April showers bring Indiana wildflowers—bluebells, bloodroot, purple larkspur, ginger, Jacob’s ladder, Dutchman’s breeches, and more! On John Muir’s birthday and the eve of Earth Day, join Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge wildflower enthusiast Marietta Smith and discover the treasures blooming on the Refuge. The off-trail exploring will require suitable clothing and shoes, as well as possible insect repellent. Participants might want to bring a sketchbook, camera, wildflower book, binoculars, etc.

Established in 1994, the Refuge is a collection of wildlife habitats situated along the Patoka River in Gibson and Pike Counties. The Friends of the Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge (established in 2009) offer various educational and fun activities for all ages to promote appreciation of this beautiful natural habitat. They also work on projects such as building trails, surveying wildlife, and eradicating invasive species. For more info, visit http://www.patokarefugef riends.org and https://www.fac ebook.com/PatokaRefugeFriends/ .

If not joining the caravan, participants will meet at the Boyd’s Trail parking lot and drive or carpool to a designated location on the Refuge. To get to the Boyd’s Trail parking lot, look for the brown Refuge sign on SR 64  just east of Oakland City, and turn north onto CR 1275E. In 1/2 mile, bear left (west) onto paved 1300 E which becomes gravel. Continue one mile to the parking lot located on the left side of the road. For more information call 812-749-3272.
Spring event #4 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Environment, Wellness

4.  John Muir in the New World:
Earth Day Documentary

presented by members of Project ACORN committee

Earth Day, Sunday, April 22, 2018, 2:00 – 3:30 pm ET
St. Benedict’s Brew Works Theatre, 860 E 10th St., Ferdinand
All ages       Free       Limit: 30
For inquiries, please contact Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call) or rockemmert@gmail.com.

A champion of the American wilderness, Scottish-American John Muir believed in the responsibility of citizens and government to protect our natural surroundings. The film John Muir in the New World honors Muir’s legacy as preservationist, naturalist, author, explorer, activist, scientist, and farmer. Born on April 21, 1838, the same year Fr. Kundek arrived here, and passing on December 24, 1914, Muir is revered as the father of the environmental movement and the founder of the Sierra Club, the oldest and largest grassroots environmental organization in the US. His impact upon the creation of our national parks and his ongoing influence is immeasurable.

To commemorate Earth Day and John Muir Day (April 21), the public is invited to learn about Muir’s life. The film uses reenactments filmed throughout the majestic landscapes he visited: Wisconsin, Yosemite and the Sierra Nevada, the Alhambra Valley of California, and the glaciers of Alaska. Placing our nation’s most important natural assets in a cultural and social context, the documentary is a timely reminder of America’s unique and threatened ecosystems. Through his tireless advocacy and his writings, Muir helped preserve the Yosemite Valley, led the fight against the Hetch Hetchy dam—the first nationwide battle of the environmental movement—and was the force behind the creation of the National Park Service.

The film premiered on PBS on April 18, 2011, as part of American Masters, a seven-time winner of the Emmy® Award for Outstanding Primetime Non-Fiction Series. The series is a production by one of America’s most prolific and respected public media providers (THIRTEEN for WNET). While attending the film, enjoy the Brew Works’ variety of craft beer, craft root beer, handmade pizza, and soft pretzels.

Spring event #5 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Art, Music

5.  Loving Vincent

film presented by members of Project ACORN committee

Sunday, April 29, 2:00 – 3:40 pm
Ferdinand Library Community Room, 112 E 16th St.
All ages       Free       Limit: 30

To register, please RSVP Kris Lasher at 812-631-2020 (text or call) or stressawaylasher@gmail.com.
Light refreshments will be served.

An experimental, imaginative work of art, Loving Vincent is a 2017 animated, biographical film dramatizing the life of Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh, and in particular, the circumstances of his death at age 37. The Polish production was recently nominated for Best Animated Feature at the 90th Academy Awards. Each of the film’s 65,000 frames is an oil painting on canvas, created by a team of 125 painters (out of 5,000 applicants) from over 20 countries, using the same impressionistic techniques as Van Gogh. The entire process took ten years to finish. The film also won Best Animated Feature Film Award at the 30th European Film Awards in Berlin.

Prone to bouts of depression, Van Gogh devoted the last decade of his life to creating over 800 oil paintings that bared his soul and continue to speak to us today. The story in the film begins one year after Van Gogh has died, purportedly from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Loving Vincent addresses the mystery of Van Gogh’s passing while honoring his portraits and landscapes with hand-painted live-action footage of real actors.

“Visually, it’s spectacular,” say critics. “Conceptually, it’s jaw-dropping to consider the effort that went into making the film. It’s mesmerizing to watch, vibrating with bursts of kinetic energy as if the screen were radioactive, as Van Gogh’s familiar stars radiate in the nighttime skies, flickering halos hover around candles, a river pulses with shimmery waves, rain falls like strips of rectangular confetti in shades of black and gray, and golden wheat waltzes in fields. If you ever wanted a masterpiece hanging in a gallery to come to life, your wish has been fully granted many times over.”

Spring event #6 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Environment, Wellness

6.  Energy Solutions to
Indiana’s Environmental/Health Crisis

discussion led by Ryan Zaricki, Alex Schmitt, and Neil Elkins

Thursday, May 3,  7:00 – 8:15 pm ET

Ferdinand Library Community Room, 112 E 16th St.
All ages       Free        Limit: 30
To register, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call) or rockemmert@gmail.com.

Indiana—especially southwestern Indiana—ranks at the bottom nationally in air and water pollution and in subsequent high cancer, infant mortality, special education, asthma, cardiovascular disease rates. What steps can we as citizens and leaders take to make a difference? This proactive discussion—led by experienced, regional leaders in solar energy, geothermal energy, energy efficiency and conservation—will focus on energy solutions: existing and emerging technologies, economics, employment opportunities, current laws, national trends, area projects, and other information to empower citizens to understand renewable energy options in southwestern Indiana.

Ryan Zaricki, native of Rockport and founder and President of Whole Sun Designs Inc, has a Bachelor’s of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, IN. Licensed as a residential general contractor, a master electrician, a photo-voltaic and solar heating installer/technician, Ryan has been in the solar industry for about a decade and has installed numerous systems in Ferdinand and southwestern Indiana. He also holds a Permaculture Design Certificate and is enthusiastic about sustainability and promoting healthy communities. He also is actively involved with the Ferdinand Folk Festival every year, providing workshops, home tours, and in recent years powering the festival’s market stage with solar energy produced onsite. For more info, visit https://www.wholesundesi gns.com/.

Alex Schmitt, from Ireland, IN, graduated from the University of Evansville in 2016 with a Bachelor’s of Science in Physics and a Bachelor’s of Spanish. He has filled multiple roles within Morton Solar, LLC. He started by installing systems, then moved into the office for project administration, then to project management, and now sales and designing. Alex remains involved with the University of Evansville by guest lecturing and mentoring students interested in energy. He is also actively involved in Evansville with multiple community gardens and is a supporter of live, original music in the region. For more info, visit https://www.mortonsolar.com/.

Neil Elkins, from TRI-CAP in Jasper, will address the agency’s Home Energy Assessment program. He will speak about energy efficiency and conservation as one means to save money while improving our regional environment TRI-CAP is an independent, non-profit organization that provides valuable health, housing, and education services and assistance to individuals and families, most of whom are low-income. For more info, visit http://www.tri-cap.net/.

Spring event #7 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Environment, Wellness

7.  Falls of the Ohio Hike

by Dale Brown

Saturday, May 5, 2018, 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm ET

Field trip to Falls of the Ohio State Park
201 W. Riverside Dr., Clarksville, Indiana

All ages
Hike is free, but if participants want to visit the renowned Interpretive Center, admission fees are $9 for 12 and older, $7 for 11 and younger, and free for children under 5.
Limit: 10

Please dress for the weather and wear walking shoes, and bring a pair of binoculars if you have them.

To join the field trip caravan, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call) or rockemmert@gmail.com. The caravan will depart from the Ferdinand Library at 10:45 am ET, stop for lunch, and return at about 4:00 pm ET.

Did you know that our neighborhood contains one of the most ancient exposed fossil beds on Earth? Falls of the Ohio State Park, located on the banks of the Ohio River at Clarksville, Indiana, across from Louisville, Kentucky, is a paleontologist’s playground. In this interpretive hike, walk with naturalist Dale Brown along the banks of the Ohio and through the park’s deciduous woods to see relics of an ancient sea dating back 390 million years to the Devonian Period, also known as the “Age of Fishes”. Hikers will also explore and study some modern-day flora and fauna. If participants choose to visit the Interpretive Center, it illustrates the natural history related to the park’s fossil beds as well as the human history of the Louisville area, covering pre-settlement, early settlement, and regional history through the 20th century. The Falls is also the site where Lewis and Clark met in 1803 and recruited one third of their corps for the their famous expedition.

Fore more info, please visit https://www.fallsoftheohio.org / and https://www.facebook.com/f allsoftheohio/.

Spring event #8 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Wellness, Environment

8.  Natural Healing Tips

by Patty Ruhe

Monday, May 7, 2018, 6:30 – 7:30 pm ET
Forest Fresh, 301 Main St., Jasper
All ages       Free       Limit: 20

To register, please RSVP Patty at 812-639-7615 (call or text) or e-mail brianandpatty@hotmail.com.

In this interactive class in the friendly atmosphere of Forest Fresh, participants will learn practical ideas to live a healthier lifestyle. Focusing on healing and improving well-being using natural means vs. reliance upon harsh chemicals, instructor Patty Ruhe will offer holistic solutions, including the long-lasting benefits of using all-natural, all-vegan products.

Patty is a certified Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) and Meridian Energy Health Tapping instructor. EFT is a healing tool used to help people with PTSD, sexual abuse, bipolar disorder, anxiety, depression, phobias, addictions, autoimmune disorders, and other ailments. Many can benefit from a natural solution found in the holistic healing arts. Patty became an EFT practitioner after she discovered how the healing arts changed her life. “I have never been this relaxed, this positive, this hopeful, this driven in my life,” she states. “I wasn’t able to enjoy the small moments in life. EFT has allowed me to change who I am.”

Forest Fresh offers handmade soaps, face creams, lotions, shampoos, conditioners, detergents, cleaners, lip balms, essential oils, vitamins, and herbal supplements. The shop also features handmade jewelry of local artisans and provides alternative and holistic health services to assist one to live life to the fullest. For more info, visit https://www.forestfreshproduct s.com/and https://www.facebook.com/fores tfreshproducts/.

Spring event #9 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Art

9.  Arm Knitting 101

by Melissa Pleiss

Wednesday, May 9, 6:30–8:30 pm ET
Serendipity Threads, 314 E 4th St., Huntingburg
Ages: 12 and older    Cost: $25    Limit: 12
To register, RSVP at www.serendipityfibers.com o r contact Melissa at 812-684-8033.

Broaden your horizons and meet new friends in this exciting, hands-on class on historic Fourth Street in Huntingburg. Participants will learn how to knit on an accessible and entertaining scale. Using your arms and the yarn provided, you will learn how to cast on, knit, and bind off a cowl using the same techniques you would use with knitting needles—and you will have a completed project before you leave! This class will be a great intro to knitting and a fun evening for diverse ages and skill levels.

If you’ve never visited Serendipity Threads, you’ll appreciate the warm and inviting nature of the historic space, complete with comfortable, relaxing sitting areas, and surrounded by an amazing collection of threads, yarns, handmade shawls, scarves, and throws. Opening “the yarn shop of [her] dreams” in July of 2014, Melissa states, “I’m blessed beyond words to have the support and love of those around me. I strive to ensure that every customer who walks through my doors feels like part of the family.” Get-to-know-your-neighbor, community-building events like her Wine and Stitch Night offered every Thursday illustrate Melissa’s vision. These events are filled with laughter and fun.

For more info, visit http://www.serendipityfi bers.com/ and https://www.face book.com/serendipityfibers.

Spring event #10 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Music

10.  Dana and Susan Robinson in Concert

co-sponsored by Project ACORN and St. Benedict’s Brew Works

Friday, June 1, 2018, 7:00 – 9:00 pm ET
St. Benedict’s Brew Works Theatre, 860 E 10th St., Ferdinand
All ages     Limit: 70

$15 per seat, 2 for $25 and can be purchased online at https://squareup.com/store/ saintbenedictsbrewworks/.

Traveling to Ferdinand from Cabot, Vermont, Appalachian roots and folk duo  Dana and Susan Robinson delight audiences with their stories and songs featuring guitar, fiddle, clawhammer banjo, and beautiful melodies and harmonies. Music Upstream calls their music “exquisite—physical and spiritual, contemporary and ancient, up to its eyeballs in mud and transcendence.” Drawing upon experiences from more than twenty years of touring across the US and Europe, Dana and Susan convey a deep understanding of America’s musical heritage and how it relates to our contemporary lives.

No strangers to Ferdinand, Susan and Dana have performed in regional house concert series, the grand opening at the Wollenmann Home, and the main stage at the 2011 Ferdinand Folk Festival. Join friends and neighbors for a memorable evening of stories, songs, and laughter in one of the area’s best listening rooms—all while enjoying craft beer and root beer brewed onsite, handmade pizza, and more.

A native of the Pacific Northwest, Dana relocated to New England where he discovered both a thriving songwriters’ scene and a deep well of traditional mountain music. In the early 1980s, Dana settled in northern Vermont and built a house “off the grid” on 30 acres near the Canadian border. There he founded a popular bakery, café, and music venue. Dana launched into full-time touring after the release of his 1994 debut CD, Elemental Lullabye, and after receiving a request to perform at Carnegie Hall in New York City for Putumayo’s Shelter benefit project. Susan, a Vermont native, moved to California where she worked for many years protecting water resources in the Monterey Bay region, and she continues her environmental advocacy today. Their home is a restored, historic Vermont schoolhouse—complete with functioning bell tower—where they host house concerts.

For more info, visit https://www.robinsongs.c om/ and https://www.facebook.c om/Dana-and-Susan-Robinson-245 400750541/.

Spring event #11 of 15

Project ACORN 2018
Art, Environment

11. Nature Art for Kids!

by Emily Meyer and members of Project ACORN committee

Monday, June 4, 2018, 6:30 – 8:00 pm ET
The Art Factory, 403 E 4th St, Huntingburg
Children of all ages        Cost: $5.00         Limit: 15
To reserve a spot, contact Emily at 812-684-9050.

Wear old clothes!

In this 100% natural class on Huntingburg’s historic Fourth Street, participants will create a unique work of art featuring nature close to home–a local object, scene, creative collage, etc. Bring your own photograph of a local nature scene or natural object, or choose one from images that will be provided. Then, using tools provided by nature (and brought by the hosts) to create unique lines (pencils made from sticks, charcoal, etc.) interesting textures (brushes made from pine, cedar branches, grass, etc.), earth-toned colors (inks, paints, and stains made from walnuts, grass, leaves, flower ink, charcoal, etc.) applied to a thin, natural-colored wooden board, or other natural surface, participants will have fun interpreting and bringing to life the scene or object in the photograph. No two creations will be alike!

Emily Meyer was born and raised in Huntingburg. A 2009 Southridge High School graduate, Emily enlisted in the US Air Force where she served for three years. She then attended the University of Southern Indiana where she completed her art degree in the spring of 2016. To share her enthusiasm for art and provide support for all ages and skill levels in the community, she opened The Art Factory in July of 2016.  The venue offers instructional classes covering various art mediums, and Emily hosts family classes, girls’ nights, and date night classes. The Art Factory even has a full kitchen on site to accommodate party needs. For more info, visit https://theartfactory.us / and https://www.facebook.com /theartfactoryhuntingburg.

Spring event #12 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Music, Art, Environment, Wellness

12.  Family Fun Day!
Benefit for the Ferdinand Folk Festival

hosted by Ferdinand Folk Festival and Project ACORN committees, and St. Benedict’s Brew Works

Sunday, June 10, 1:00 – 4:00 pm ET
St. Benedict’s Brew Works and lawn, 860 E 10th St., Ferdinand
All ages
Admission: $10 for adults, $3 for children
Help support the ninth annual Ferdinand Folk Festival while having a fun time with your family and friends! Bring lawn chairs or blankets for live music on the lawn. The festival committee members are offering an afternoon of fun for all ages, featuring

• artisan root beer floats
• activities for kids, including a family-friendly film beginning
at 2 pm ET in brewery theatre (limit 40)
• the reggae music of Zion, a 2018 Ferdinand Folk Festival
NextEra Energy Main Stage artist
• the music of local performer Debbie Schuetter
• pizza, pretzels, and artisan beverages
• festival merchandise and more

This year’s Ferdinand Folk Festival is Saturday, September 15. For more info, visit http://www.ferdinandfolk festival.com/ and https://www.facebook.com/ferdi nandfolkfestival/.

Spring event #13 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Environment, Wellness

13.  Health Concerns about
Proposed Coal-to-Diesel
Refinery in Dale

discussion led by Dr. Erin Marchand, Mary Hess, and Randy Vaal

Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 6:30 – 8:00 pm ET
Ferdinand Library Community Room, 112 E 16th St.

All ages     Free    Limit: 30

To register, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call) or rockemmert@gmail.com.

This community conversation is for parents, teachers, students, church leaders, and all concerned about the health and quality of life in our area. If citizens have medical, scientific, or other questions about the proposal for a huge coal-to-diesel refinery within the Dale city limits, Erin Marchand, MD, chemical engineer Randy Vaal, and concerned citizen Mary Hess have conducted extensive research into the proposal and will lead a conversation to better inform citizens.

Dr. Erin Marchand is a board certified family medicine physician. She graduated from the Ohio  State College of Medicine in 2008. After serving six years in the Air Force, she and her family moved to Dale, IN. She is currently practicing in Santa Claus. Dr. Marchand has read and studied the air quality permit in depth. She will share her findings.

Mary Hess grew up in Tell City and received her bachelor’s degree in education from Oakland City College. She was the first director of the Dale Community Center and retired from the US Postal Service after 30 years. She now works part time for Dale State Agency. She spends her free time in the woods and kayaking. “I love God’s creation,” she states, “and until a couple of months ago, I only quietly spoke my opinion about environmental effects in the surrounding area. It took something happening close to home to find my voice to speak up.”

Randy is a retired chemical engineer with an undergraduate degree from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and a masters from the University of Houston. He spent several years as a chemical process engineer followed by over 30 years as an engineer in the oil and gas industry. He produced the world’s most successful software product to help manage oil and gas fields. He grew up in Ferdinand and now lives in Santa Claus. Randy also has studied the air quality permit in depth and will share his findings.

For more information, visit www.noc2d.com.

Spring event #14 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Art

14. Making Italian Limoncello!

by Doug Thayer

Tuesday, June 19, 6:30 – 8:30 pm ET
Monkey Hollow Winery & Distillery, 11534 E CR 1740 N, St. Meinrad

Ages 21 and over       $15       Limit: 10

To register, please RSVP Kris at 812-631-2020 (text or call) or stressawaylasher@gmail.com.

Limoncello is an Italian lemon liqueur produced mainly in southern Italy, especially in the region around the Gulf of Naples, the Sorrentine Peninsula, the coast of Amalfi, and the islands of Procida, Ischia, and Capri. It’s also a popular homemade liqueur as some local residents have discovered. Join Doug Thayer in this fun, interactive class where participants will learn how to make their own delicious beverage using locally made distilled products. The fee will cover all the ingredients. Participants are asked to bring a sealable mason jar or bottle of their choice and may also want to bring an extra container for the lemon pulp because it won’t be used in the limoncello; instead, it may be used to make lemonade at home.

Doug tasted his first sample of the lovely nectar when friends returned from Europe and shared the after-dinner drink recommended to the couple while in Italy where lemons grow readily. They also served the drink in tiny, frozen glasses as they had first experienced it. “I asked about how it was made,” Doug said. Known for trying to make things from scratch, his friends are more than happy to encourage him, and they get the results—good or bad! Making his first batch over the July 4th weekend, and experimenting with different spirits, he eventually made four different flavored batches—lemon, lime, orange, and grapefruit—to take along to see the total eclipse in Carbondale. He shared another batch at a Christmas party. “With plenty of FFA fruit to use, I had lots of flavors,” he recalls.

Doug lives in Schnellville and teaches math and physics at Orleans High School. He loves watching cooking shows on PBS and takes most recipes as a suggestion. “Varying a recipe sometimes lead to new dishes,” he says. He is married to Janice, and they have three children, Case, Emerson, and Hailey—and they have many fury creatures at home as well. Doug loves to create things, such as a skinned kayak, so he and his wife can tour the local lakes.

Monkey Hollow, nestled in the rolling hills of Spencer County, is a family-owned and operated winery and distillery that also offers locally-produced food. Their first distilled spirit, Monkey Shine, was released in 2017, with an expanded line of distilled products to follow. For more info, visit http://www.monkeyholloww inery.com/ and https://www.fac ebook.com/monkeyhollow/.

Spring event #15 of 15
Project ACORN 2018
Environment, Wellness

Composting: Healthy Soil, Healthy Living

by Jerry Steckler

Saturday, June 23, 10:00 – 11:00 am ET
Steckler Grassfed, 21477 N County Rd 600 E, Dale, IN
All ages     Free (donations appreciated)    Limit: None
To register, please RSVP Kris Lasher at 812-631-2020 (text or call) or stressawaylasher@gmail.com.

Healthy living begins with healthy soil. Get to know local farmer Jerry Steckler, owner of Steckler Grassfed, who will lead a fun, interactive, outdoor class about the fundamental value of composting. Learn how composting enriches soil, helps retain moisture, and suppresses plant diseases and pests. Steckler Grassfed uses compost to reintroduce vital nutrients to the soil—no pesticides or herbicides are used—allowing a hearty crop of earthworms to repopulate the soil with nutrients the natural way. Using no antibiotics, no steroids, and no hormones, the farm became certified organic in 2007 with Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA).

Consuming meat, eggs, and dairy products from animals raised on pasture improves the welfare of the animals, reduces environmental harm, assists small-scale farmers to make a living from the land, helps to sustain rural communities, and gives families the healthiest food possible. “It’s been a pleasure building relationships with folks over these past 17 years,” states Jerry. Believing the philosophy that people should eat what is readily available vs. food shipped from hundreds or thousands of miles away, Jerry enjoys providing people with a local source for high-quality, nutritious food.

For more info, visit https://stecklergrassfed .com/, https://www.facebook.co m/stecklergrassfed/ and http:/ /www.eatwild.com/basics.html.

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