Project Acorn: New Year, New Offerings

To help brighten the winter season, Project ACORN is offering 15 new music, art, environment, and wellness opportunities for all ages. An acronym for Art, Community, Originality, Rhythm, and Nature, the homegrown, grassroots, mostly-volunteer program provides diverse and creative events that build friendships, explore new ideas, and foster community. Enthusiastic leaders and partnerships offer (often free of charge) classes, workshops, theatrical events, hikes, films, concerts, and field trips for all ages.

Through the past ten seasons, since June of 2016, dozens of area citizens have led 150 events with about 1,800 participants getting involved.

Some highlights from the recent autumn season include a concert by three-time Grammy winner Native American Bill Miller, a kayaking trip, a class about and tour to Ferdinand’s Freedom Settlement Cemetery, a tour of a straw bale home, co-sponsoring a health forum related to the proposed coal-to-diesel refinery in Dale, a hike in Lincoln State Park, a labyrinth-making class, a ghost walk in historic New Harmony, visiting the historic Little Shubael Pioneer Village in Rocky Point, concerts by the Troubadours and The Honey Vines, and more.

Jane Goodall, an inspiration for many Project ACORN activities, once said,“I think the best evenings are when we [experience] things that make us think, but we can also laugh and enjoy each other’s company.” We invite you to participate in one or more of these exciting upcoming winter events.
—committee members Rock Emmert, Kris Lasher, Brooke Daunhauer, Collin Daunhauer, and Jill Sicard

Project ACORN (Art, Community, Originality, Rhythm, and Nature) builds upon the mission of the Ferdinand Folk Festival—to celebrate and build community through music, art, environment, and wellness education—by expanding the one-day event into a four-season series of mostly free classes, hikes, field trips, concerts, films, workshops, etc., for citizens of Ferdinand and neighboring communities.


PROJECT ACORNWINTER SCHEDULE

2019short form (scroll down for details)

1. Candlelight Walk to Lincoln Cabinfield trip led by members Project ACORN committee
Saturday, Jan. 19, 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm ET, Lincoln Living Historial Farm

2. Thunderheart filmby members of Project ACORN committee
Thursday, Jan. 24, 7 – 9 pm ET, St. Benedict’s Brew Works Theatre

3. Food Preservation by Pressure Canningby Randy Vaal
Wednesday, Jan. 30, 7 – 8 pm ET, Ferdinand Library Community Room

4. Ferdinand, children’s filmby members of Project ACORN committee
Saturday, Feb. 2, 10 am – 12 noon ET, Ferdinand Library Community Room

5. A Conversation about Death and Dyingby Jan Stenftenagel
Thursday, Feb. 7, 6:30 – 8:30 pm ET, Ferdinand Library Community Room

6. Fabulous Fibers Exhibit at Audubon Museumfield trip led by members of Project ACORN committee
Sunday, Feb. 10, 12:30 pm – 6 pm ET, John James Audubon Museum

7. Writing to Inspire Changewriting workshop by Chris Mattingly
Saturday, Feb. 16, 9:30 am – 12 noon ET, Ferdinand Library Community Room

8. An Evening with Chris Mattinglystories and poetry readingSaturday, Feb. 16, 7 – 8 pm ET, St. Benedict’s Brew Works Theatre

9. Honoring Native American Artby Marie Daunhauer
Thursday, Feb. 21, 7 – 8 pm ET, Ferdinand Library Community Room

10. Jesus Christ Superstar presented by Think PINK Productions, Evansville fieldtrip led by Project ACORN committee members Saturday, Feb 23, 8:30 pm ET, 6:45 pm ET departure 

11. National Players at St. Meinrad Bede Theatre fieldtrip led by Project ACORN committee members
Twelfth Night, Friday, March 8, 8 pm ET, departure 7:15 pm ET
Round the World, Saturday, March 9, 8 pm ET, departure 7:15 pm ET

12. Neil Yockey: St. Patrick’s Day Eve Concert Saturday, March 16, 7 – 9 pm ET, St. Benedict’s Brew Works Theatre

13. Small Town Spring Talent Show organized by members of Project ACORN committee
Saturday, March 23, 7 – 9 pm ET, St. Benedict’s Brew Works Theatre

14. Riverwalk Hike and Historic Schaeffer Barn Tour by Joe Rohleder and Project ACORN committee members Saturday, March 30, 9 – 11 am ET, Schaeffer Barn, Jasper Riverwalk 

15. Colin Powell at USIfield trip led by Project ACORN committee members
Thursday, April 4, 7 pm ET, 4:45 departure, USI Arena, Evansville

PROJECT ACORNWINTER SCHEDULE 2019
1. Candlelight Walk to Lincoln Cabin
field trip
Saturday, Jan. 19, 6:30 pm ET departure from Ferdinand Library, return at approximately 9:00 pm ETCandlelight Walk is open to public from 5:30 – 9:00 pm ET for anyone wishing to travel separately.  
Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial (follow signs)
3027 E South St, Lincoln City, Indiana
All ages      Free       Limit: 8

What to bring: Comfortable outdoor or hiking shoes; dress in layers; no refreshments are available; guests may bring water bottles
To register, please RSVP Kris Lasher at 812-631-2020 (text or call).
Participate in a family-friendly, candlelit walk to a beautiful, rustic cabin at the Lincoln Living Historical Farm — the actual site of Abraham Lincoln’s boyhood home. With a fire in the hearth, the cabin will feature re-enactors Bob Zimmerman, Doris Pfaff, and John Pfaff and possibly others to interact with guests and show people of all ages what pre-electricity life would have been like for early settlers in southwestern Indiana. Through sights, sounds, and scents, guests will experience a unique nostalgic atmosphere as the sun sets and candles chase away the darkness. The self-guided walk will feature many locally handcrafted wooden lanterns lit by hand-crafted candles (all inspired by the period) lining a long, meandering path through the winter woods and farm to the cabin. Lincoln Boyhood  National Memorial preserves the site of the farm where Abraham spent 14 formative years of his life from the ages of 7 to 21.  He and his family moved to Indiana in 1816 and stayed until 1830 when they moved to Illinois. For official information about Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial, please visit http://www.nps.gov/libo.
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2. Thunderheart, Film
Thursday, Jan. 24, 7 – 9 pm ETSt. Benedict’s Brew Works theatre
Ages: 17 and older      Free      Limit: 40
To register, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call).
A mainstream film known for respectfully illuminating Native American issues, Thunderheart was inspired by actual events that occurred on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota between 1971 and 1978. Released 500 years after Columbus’ landing, the 1992 film, produced by Robert De Niro and starring Val Kilmer, Sam Shepard, Graham Greene, and John Trudell, gives an accurate account of Sioux customs, language, and spirituality. The film’s theme of corporate/government collusion to exploit nature and Native lands for profit remains relevant today. Central to the story and cast of powerful characters, including performances by native actors, is the transformation of one FBI agent with suppressed part-Sioux ancestry. Because of its occasional violence and language, the film — a powerful, action, coming-of-age adventure — has received an R rating. John Fusco wrote the script; British director Michael Apted directed the film; and James Horner directed the music. Join friends and neighbors for a memorable evening in one of the area’s best listening rooms—all while enjoying craft beer and root beer brewed onsite, handmade pizza, soft pretzels, veggie burgers, and more.
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3. Food Preservation by Pressure Canning
by Randy Vaal
Wednesday, Jan. 30, 7:00 – 8:00 pm ET
Ferdinand Library Community Room
All ages       Free       Limit: 40
To register, please RSVP Kris Lasher at 812-631-2020 (text or call). If anybody has questions in advance, they can feel free to contact Randy at rjvaal@gmail.com or at 281-202-8143.
What to bring:  If you want to have Randy look at old jars or canners, feel free to bring them along.

Preserving fresh food for consumption when fresh food is not available has long challenged humanity. Historically, many methods of preserving food have existed, but about 100 years ago the notion of “pressure canning” was introduced as a safe way of canning meat and low-acid vegetables, among other foods. Our parents and grandparents may have owned pressure canners. Since home freezers have become commonplace, pressure canning has become less practiced. Once food is preserved via pressure canning, it is safe for consumption for many months and requires no additional energy to save it for a later date. It is a healthy and environmentally-conscious means of preserving food that our ancestors knew, and which we would be wise to continue.
Randy Vaal grew up in Ferdinand and was introduced to pressure canning by his mother, who used the technique to preserve meat and garden vegetables.  Randy will show both old and new versions of pressure canners, discuss official methods of pressure canning, and offer examples of food preserved through pressure canning.
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4. Ferdinand, Children’s Film
Saturday, Feb. 2, 10 am – 12 noon ET
Ferdinand Library Community Room
Ages: 6+      Free        Limit: 40
Popcorn will be served.
The heart-warming animated film Ferdinand promotes compassion, acceptance of others, and nonviolence. After Ferdinand, a bull with a big heart who does not want to fight, is mistaken for a dangerous beast, he is captured and torn from his home. Determined to return to his family, he rallies a misfit team on the ultimate adventure. Based on Munro Leaf and Robert Lawson’s classic 1936 children’s book The Story of FerdinandFerdinand received a nomination for Best Animated Feature at the Academy Awards. It also received nominations for Best Animated Feature Film and Best Original Song (“Home”) at the 75th Golden Globe Awards. The all-star cast includes John Cena’s voice as Ferdinand and Kate McKinnon’s as Lupe, an old goat and Ferdinand’s mentor.
Coincidentally to the film’s 2017 release, in 2016 Project ACORN member Kris Lasher, with support from Deb Abell, Doug Abell, and Leah Robling, led a popular adaptation of the children’s classic as a summer activity. The resulting musical involved enthusiastic children performing two packed shows at the Ferdinand Folk Festival. And in 2016-17, muralist Lisa Thalhammer, inspired by the musical and with support from the Dubois County Community Foundation and others, completed the huge attractive mural of Ferdinand the Bull on her cousin Keith Fritz’s Fine Furniture building at 14th and Main.
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5. A Conversation about Death and Dying
by Jan Stenftenagel
Thursday, Feb. 7, 6:30 – 8:30 pm ET
Ferdinand Library Community Room
Ages: 18 and over     Free       Limit: 20
To register, please RSVP Jan at jstenftenagel@gmail.com.

Recognizing the finiteness of life helps one to live more fully. Talking about death for some brings fear and discomfort. This informal wellness class, led by an experienced educator, will provide a forum to discuss fears and concerns about death and dying, and to encourage people to make the most of their lives. Inspired by the international “Death Cafe” movement and the groundbreaking work of Dr. Elizabeth Kübler-Ross and others, Jan Stenftenagel will invite participants to share their thoughts, experiences, and ideas. Not intended to be a grief support group or end-of-life planning session, the gathering will serve as a casual means for people interested in pondering philosophical questions. Why do many fear death in our culture? How do our views of death inform the way we live?
Before retiring from Vincennes University Jasper Campus, Jan taught a 16-week course titled “Sociological Aspects of Death” for 20 semesters, along with English and communication courses. She is married to Charles and spends her time reading, cooking, gardening, and traveling. She is currently immersed in working through the genealogy of the Gramelspacher-Stenftenagel families.
Tea and baked goods will be served.
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6. Fabulous Fibers Exhibitat Audubon Museum
field trip
Sunday, Feb. 10, 12:30 pm ET departure from Ferdinand Library, return at approximately 6:00 pm ET.The John James Audubon Museum is open to public from 11:00 am – 6:00 pm ET seven days a week, for anyone wishing to travel separately.The exhibit ends on Feb. 15. 
John James Audubon Museum inJohn James Audubon State Park3100 US Hwy 41 N, Henderson KY 

All agesAdmission: Families (2 adults, 2 children) $15.00; adults (18+) $6.00; seniors (60+) $5.00; military $5.00; children/students (6 -17 & college w/ID) $4.00; children 5 & under free                                          Limit: 10
To register, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call).

The beauty of a quaint, wooded park near the Ohio River, the French architecture of a historic museum, and the stunning textile art from Indiana artists who have exhibited all over the United States and internationally — all this and more will greet participants in this unique field trip to Henderson, Kentucky. The innovative, contemporary, fiber art exhibit, “Fabulous Fibers III” features 55 fascinating quilts that fill the lower and main levels of the museum. The exhibits include the work of local artisan Beth Schnellenberger. Other featured textile artists from Studio Art Quilt Associates are Jackie Brinkman, Jennifer Broemel, Mary Bunte, Pamela Burns, Susan Conaway, Lisa Dodson, Susie Goodman, Karen Hampton, Ann Luther, Pamela Mick, Daren Redman, Barbara Triscari, Judy Tucker, and Joan Webb. The museum is open to public from 11:00 am – 6:00 pm ET, seven days a week. The exhibit opened on Oct. 25 and ends on Feb. 15. 
Named for the famed ornithologist, naturalist, and wildlife painter John James Audubon, the park and museum have a rich history. The museum, nature center, and park offices have a home in Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration buildings, illustrating European architectural flair and reflecting Audubon’s heritage. Over 200 objects are on display, including artifacts from Audubon’s Kentucky years, a complete set of his masterwork, The Birds of America, and many original artworks presented in the context of world events. The museum and nature center, perched on the edge of the park’s beautiful nature preserve, provide multiple art and nature educational opportunities for all ages. Free admission to the nature center gives visitors access to a wildlife observation room, the Audubon Theater, and the Discovery and Learning Center. Several hiking trails begin and end near the Nature Center, allowing for vibrant outdoor experiences year-round. For more information visit https://parks.ky.gov/parks/recreationparks/john-james/.
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7. Writing to Inspire Change
Writing workshop by Chris Mattingly
Saturday, Feb. 16, 9:30 am – 12 noon ET 
Ferdinand Library Community Room
Ages: 18 and over    Fee: $15      Limit: 12    
What to bring: anything comfortable to write withpen, pencil, paper; ideally, a special notebook and pen; laptop or tablet.   
To register, please RSVP Kris Lasher at stressawaylasher@gmail.com or 812-631-2020 (text or call).
Writing is an act of the imagination, and any act of the imagination is an empowering, self-validating achievement. Through writing we reflect, re-envision, invent, and project. In other words, writing is one of the ways we give our lives meaning. In this workshop participants will consider ways to express our challenging and traumatic stories with the hope that writing can help us to become better. We will read and discuss poems by established poets as well as generate our own work. This workshop is designed to empower and inspire.
Chris Mattingly is a poet, bookmaker, and professor of writing and literature at Bellarmine University and IUS. His students compliment his intelligent, thoughtful, and kind demeanor, and his capacity to engage his students in meaningful discussions. He has an MFA in Poetry from Spalding University, and he graduated from Indiana University with a bachelor’s degree in English and folklore. The author of two full-length collections of poems The Catalyst (2018) and Scuffletown (2013), Mattingly explores themes of grief, despair, decay, addiction, poverty, and violence through the lens of forgiveness and bewilderment. You can explore his work and listen to him read at thepoetchrismattingly.com
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8. An Evening with Chris Mattingly
Saturday, Feb. 16, 7:00 – 8:00 pm ET
St. Benedict Brew Works Theatre
Ages: 18 and over       Free, tips welcomed        Limit: 70
Enjoy an evening with Evansville native and poet Chris Mattingly. A popular literature and writing professor at Bellarmine University and IUS, Mattingly has written about family, love, violence, baseball, and the contrast between tough, gritty streets and the promise of a young child. His poems explore themes of grief, despair, decay, addiction, poverty, and violence through the lens of forgiveness and bewilderment. One can explore his work and listen to him read at thepoetchrismattingly.com. He has an MFA in Poetry from Spalding University, and he graduated from Indiana University with a bachelor’s degree in English and folklore. One of his popular course titles is Streets of Grit in American Lit. 
Mattingly is the author of two full-length collections of poems: The Catalyst (2018) and Scuffletown (2013) as well as several chapbooks, zines, and photo-books including Ad HocA Light for Your BeaconStreetnik, and Citizenplain. His work has appeared in The Louisville ReviewSawmillRiver Styx, and The Lumberyard. A bookmaker using handmade techniques, Mattingly also sees value in literary readings in diverse venues—art spaces, coffee houses, neighborhood taverns, basements, and living rooms. Mattingly, who studied under Indiana University professor Ross Gay, recognizes his significant influences, including his father who gave him “permission to be emotional, to be vulnerable, to be sensitive, and to be open”. 
Join friends and neighbors for a memorable evening of stories and poems in one of the area’s best listening rooms—all while enjoying craft beer and root beer brewed onsite, handmade pizza, and more.

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9. Honoring Native American Art
by Marie Daunhauer
Thursday, February 21, 7 – 8 pm ET
Ferdinand Library Community Room
All ages         Free         Limit: 40
To register, please RSVP Marie Daunhauer at 812-639-1582.  

As Indiana was named for the Indians who used to live here, this class invites participants to appreciate some of the art that Native people have created. Today over 500 federally recognized tribes live in the United States. Depending on the tribe’s location, the materials to make their artwork have included rocks, feathers, cloth, clay, and fabric. Blending the necessity of function with the art of form, for thousands of years indigenous people on this continent expressed and continue to express themselves in beautiful and unique ways. 
Marie Daunhauer’s husband David always had an interest in Native American culture. In the 1930s, his aunt and several nuns went to North Dakota to start an Indian mission. David would visit there in the summer and work in the stores. His job was to sort and price the donations. There he also learned about the reality of the poverty of the people living on the reservation. Later, David and Marie started collecting Native American works with a few bags of beaded art. Over the years they have purchased other handmade items from a retail artifact collector and from antique shops. Marie will be sharing some items from their collection including clothing, pottery, baskets, dolls, purses, bags, and saddle blankets. She also will explain the origins of some of the pieces as well as specific customs related to some items in the collection.
Marie retired from teaching (mostly fourth grade) for 32 years at Ferdinand Elementary School. The grandmother of Project ACORN committee member Collin Daunhauer, Marie enjoys playing cards with friends, playing the piano or organ, and painting. On a note relevant to Native American art in Ferdinand, on December 8, 2018, Mohican-American artist Bill Miller, three-time Grammy winner, performed a concert in the St. Benedict’s Brew Works theatre. Miller is also a visual artist.
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10. Jesus Christ Superstar 
presented by Think PINK Productionsfield trip by Project ACORN committee
Saturday, Feb 23, 8:30 pm ET, 6:45 pm ET departure from Ferdinand Library 
Evansville theatre location TBA
Ages: 18 and over        Admission: $22          Limit: 10
To register, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call).
Think PINK Productions strives to offer thought-provoking theatre experiences by creating a positive and professional environment. With Jesus being portrayed by Jasper native Brandon Eck, Jesus Christ Superstar tells the story of biblical Jesus in the final days leading up to his crucifixion. A rock opera by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, the musical has no spoken dialogue and is sometimes considered a modern rock-opera. Loosely based on the Gospels, Superstar focuses on the personal conflicts between Jesus, his disciples, the people of Israel, and the leadership of Rome. Special attention is played to the relationship between Judas Iscariot and Jesus, as well as Jesus’ relationship with Mary Magdalene. The musical is unique among biblical retellings in that it focuses on both Judas’ struggle making the decision to betray Jesus and Jesus’ human psychology, fear, and anger in understanding and accepting his role as both leader and martyr. The show is a product of its era, permeated with 1970s rock, gospel, folk and funk themes, modern language and colloquialisms, and high-energy dance numbers. The show runs Feb. 22, 23, 24. For more info, visit https://www.thinkpinkevv.com/ and Facebook.
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11. National Players at St. Meinrad Bede TheatreTwelfth Night and Round the World in 80 Days
field trip
Twelfth Night, Friday, March 8, 8:00 pm ET, departure from Ferdinand Library at 7:15 pm ETRound the World, Saturday, March 9, 8:00 pm ET, departure from Ferdinand Library at 7:15 pm ET
All ages       Free        Limit: None
To register, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call).
The National Players are a 10-member, professional acting company that performs three shows each season across the US. Celebrating its 70th season, National Players is a unique ensemble bringing innovative theater to stages across the United States. Founded in 1949, National Players stimulates youthful imagination and critical thinking by presenting classic plays in invigorating ways for modern audiences. National Players has performed in 41 states; in the White House; and for the American military in Europe, Asia, and the Arctic Circle. Committed to artistic excellence and community engagement, National Players has brought literature to life for nearly three million people.

Twelfth Night was written by William Shakespeare in 1601. Shipwrecked and alone, Viola disguises herself as a boy and enters into Duke Orsino’s service. Lovesick Orsino sends her to court the Lady Olivia, but Olivia is much more interested in this cute young newcomer. When, unbeknownst to her, Viola’s identical twin Sebastian also washes ashore, a merry brand of chaos ensues. One of Shakespeare’s most delightful plays, Twelfth Night is a classic tale of reckless revenge, mistaken identity, and mismatched lovers. All audiences will enjoy the National Players’ fresh take on this spirited story, directed by Jenna Duncan.

Around the World in 80 Days is based on the novel by Jules Verne. The time: 1872. The claim: The world can be traveled in 80 days. The wager: 20,000 pounds. Determined to win, Phileas Fogg sets off with a rigid itinerary and bewildered new valet in tow — only to discover the unpredictable just might be the most rewarding of all. Join the National Players as they travel by boat, train, and elephant in Jules Verne’s epic adventure. Full of daring rescues, brash duels, and unexpected romance, Around the World in 80 Days is a trip you won’t soon forget. The stage adaptation was written by Laura Eason, and the play is directed by Jared Mezzocchi.
12. Neil YockeySt. Patrick’s Day Eve Concert
Saturday, March 16, 7 – 9 pm ET
St. Benedict’s Brew Works Theatre
All ages     $5 cover    Limit: 70
Join Neil Yockey for a night of great entertainment to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day and the arrival of spring. Winner of the Indiana flatpick division in picking and fiddling contests in 2006 and 2015, Neil is a solo acoustic guitarist and vocalist who covers a variety of music styles. His influences include Michael Hedges, James Alan Shelton, and early Bob Dylan. Neil has been playing 30+ years. He’s worked with a few bands, including Folk Wave Station and Retro Shock, but usually plays solo. Recently Neil has been focused on an interesting variety of music including traditional Irish tunes and 80s New Wave. He released a well-reviewed Alt. Rock album in 2018 called Light and Shadow. You can find Neil’s upcoming performance dates and samples of his music at neilyockey.com. Join friends and neighbors for a memorable evening of stories and poems in one of the area’s best listening rooms — all while enjoying craft beer and root beer brewed onsite, handmade pizza, and more.
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13.Small Town Spring Talent Show
organized by members of Project ACORN committee
Saturday, March 23, 7 – 9 pm ET
All ages     Free       Performer limit: 20       Audience seat limit: 70
To register for a spot on the stage or a seat for the show, please RSVP Kris Lasher at 812-631-2020 (text or call) and specify if you would like to perform.
Dust off your musical instrument; find that original poem, short story, or joke; warm up those vocal chords, and take the stage for this family-friendly event. Our communities are filled with talented individuals of all ages. If you have a family-friendly talent you want to share, please sign up. Each performer will have up to 5 minutes to share a song, instrumental, poem, story, comedy, or other talent. The stage size is 5 ft x 9 ft, which limits the number of individuals able to perform at the same time.
Performers should RSVP what they intend to share so that the performance schedule can be arranged to best suit the audience.
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14. Riverwalk Hikeand Historic Schaeffer Barn Tour
by Joe Rohleder and Project ACORN committee
Saturday, March 30, 9 – 11 am ET 
Schaeffer Barn, 401-499 E 4th St, Jasper
Meet at parking lot by the Schaeffer Barn along Jasper Riverwalk  
All ages          Free        Limit: 20
To register, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call).
The hike on the beautiful Riverwalk during this early spring morning will last about one hour, followed by a casual, educational visit with Joe Rohleder back at the historic Schaeffer barn, where fresh Azura bagels, coffee, and hot chocolate will await. Local historian and preservation advocate, Rohleder will lead a talk and discussion about the barn and other exciting developments in the neighborhood. Known as the Schaeffer Barn in honor of the Prussian immigrants who began its construction some 170 years ago, this hand-hewn log structure was originally located on a farm south of Ferdinand. The first half was built in 1845 by Johann Franz Schaeffer and his son, John Anton Schaeffer. In 1860, the second half was built for grain storage, and in the 1880s the two parts were combined. It remained in the Schaeffer family until it was generously donated to the Redevelop Old Jasper Action Coalition by their descendants, Dave and Dennis Luebbehusen. The barn was disassembled in 2005 and reassembled in its present location in 2006 by a group of volunteers. Instrumental in historic preservation projects in the area, Joe Rohleder retired from teaching at Jasper High School in 1999 and has won numerous honors in teaching and coaching in the community. He has also served as a member of Board of Directors of Indiana Landmarks.
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15.Colin Powell at USI
Field trip by Project ACORN committee
Thursday, April 4, 7 pm ET, 4:45 departure from Ferdinand Library
USI Arena, 8600 University Blvd, Evansville, IN

All ages       Free        Limit: 12
To register, please RSVP Rock Emmert at 812-631-2856 (text or call).
The University of Southern Indiana will present “Leadership: Taking Charge,” a moderated discussion with retired General Colin Powell. The son of Jamaican immigrants, Powell was born in Harlem in April 1937, and was raised in the South Bronx. He received a commission as an Army second lieutenant in 1958 and went on to serve in the United States Army for 35 years, rising to the rank of Four-Star General. His autobiography, My American Journey, was a New York Times bestseller and has been published in more than a dozen languages. Powell’s second book, It Worked for Me: In Life & Leadership (May 2012), was an instant New York Times bestseller as well and reveals the lessons that shaped his life and career. Powell earned a bachelor’s degree in geology from the City College of New York.
Under President George W. Bush, Powell was appointed the 65th Secretary of State and was unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate. As Secretary of State, he led the State Department in major efforts to address and solve regional and civil conflicts. He used the power of diplomacy to build trust, forge alliances and then help transform these unstable regions into areas where societies and cultures have the potential to prosper. He also worked at the forefront of American efforts to advance economic and social development worldwide.
General Powell will be the fourth speaker in the University’s Romain College of Business Innovative Speaker Series. Previous speakers include T. Boone Pickens, legendary entrepreneur and philanthropist in 2013, Dr. Ben Bernanke, former chairman of the Federal Reserve in 2015, and Dr. Oscar Salazar, founding chief technology officer of Uber in 2017. 

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